How many times have you said yes to something and regretted it later? Often these are small decisions producing small pain for the wrong choice. But what happens when it’s a big choice? Like a project or a job?

Welcome back to my summer blog series based on Brad Egeland’s (www.BradEgeland.com) article that appeared in www.ProjectTimes.com early July entitled ‘11 Reasons Why My Project Manager Is Better Than Yours’.   

Last week’s post was titled “Rookies ARE a good thing.”

Today, we visit a theme that comes up often when I talk to potential leaders and project managers.


“Choose your successes. It is ok to go out on a limb. That’s how you learn and grow. Choose your battles carefully. But you want wins – wins are good for PM confidence and morale as well as your reputation, your PMO’s reputation, and your company’s reputation.”

In my workshop called From A Good Project Manager To a Great Leader we highlight the fact that every project manager is not alike and every leader is not alike. Be careful what you wish for. You do not want to get yourself into a scenario where you are underqualified for or worse even, destined to fail.

Do your due diligence before you accept the position, or the job, or the project. They are checking you out so you should be spending some time checking them out. Do you have the support required? If the position, or work, is a little bit of a stretch for you, do you have the coaches or mentors in place to get you up to speed? Are the requirements clear enough for you to know what you’re getting yourself into?

The list of questions you should be asking is even longer than this but you get the idea.

As Brad said, “you want wins” but just as much, you do not want losses. Gaps in your resume will stand out. Lack of references from a position that you clearly held will stand out.  But more importantly, the hit on your morale and ego will stand out as well.

My advice is… don’t go there. Do your homework, ask lots of questions and be sure you do not bite off more than you can chew.

And if you do? Get out fast. Don’t hesitate, do not pass GO, do not collect $100. Run. It’s good for everyone: you, the project and the organization.

Image courtesy of www.freedigitalphotos.net

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